Translate

5 Million Key Masters--330 Million Suspects!

Who doesn't know the secrets? Who is not a suspect?

Leak risk: So many security clearances

In the mammoth national security community, any one of the nearly 5 million Americans with a security clearance could become a leaker.
The dramatic disclosures by Edward Snowden show just how vulnerable even the most rigorous screening can be to contractors or employees who’ve made up their minds to share the nation’s secrets. The process for clearing trustworthy men and women is intense – but imperfect. And with so many people who have access to classified information, there are limits to how much the government can do to stop determined leakers.
Do I see anyone asking why the "leakers" feel the need to leak?

Would that not be the first question... unless the answer is already known!

At what point in time do you realize that inflated, bloated anything cannot be good... especially when loaded with unsavory or contentious content and very conscientious citizens?

The recent spate of whistleblowers, or modern day Paul Revere types are gradually swelling in number and becoming more informative as time goes by. Usually, the sentinel is a person with high moral fiber and a deep interest in warning fellow citizens of "threats" they are aware of.

In the olden days this activity was mainly appreciated when foreign interests were gearing up to do harm at the homefront. Today, curiously, many citizens are more afraid of their own governance than foreign "bad guys."

If a government continuously harasses its citizens or otherwise implements unjust, unfair, inequitable treatment and then treats them as though they were a threat, it is understandable that particular government is on its way to oblivion. Continually spanking citizens for their own good is hardly an adult or mature approach, the heavy hand is most likely to encourage resentful and restless constituents.

Populations are no longer accepting the reason for what amounts to social confinement and barbaric policing,  the reasons cited are often discovered to be mistakes at best and outright lies at worst. 

You... the tax paying citizen are expected to bear the brunt of repressive and aggressive government controls because some vague and often shadowy "bad guy" might be mounting some sort of mayhem somewhere at some time. In other words millions of harmless and law abiding citizens become categorized as suspects and are subjected to the acrimonious controls said to be for the illusionary enemy.

How long before enough is enough?

As can be seen from recent violent and dramatic reactions around the globe, there is a tipping point where beleaguered citizens snap and retaliate for either perceived or real government inspired travesties, be they economic, social, or violence related. If elitist factions are exempt from government suppression and litigation where it was warranted, then citizens eventually realize and question ethics, integrity and inequity.

Failure to respond to pleas for sense creates a tinderbox situation and it is no surprise when society rebels.

Fortunately advanced civilization most often seeks reconciliation through peaceful ways, but only if its civil servants assist and not prevent.

My hope is current leadership throughout the western world, know and understand the difference between justice and injustice and do not try to circumvent what is "right".

Right is a condition of sense and compliance to the documents of constitution, pretending these can be made exceptional for any desired agenda is foolish and provocative--it is certain citizens will respond in kind if provoked beyond reason.

The first step in remedial action is to return the status of innocent until proven guilty, to uphold the rights and privileges of the freefolk and not engage citizens in unfounded accusation or examinations without just cause.

Until these two fundamental rights are righted and the servants of the public understand who is who and act accordingly with respect and transparency... they are begging for trouble, needless, senseless trouble.

Who would want that... and why?

While reasonable folks realize a need for certain state secrets, these should not extend or translate into onerous treatment of the common citizen, to do so transcends every bond of trust. Trust is earned, not granted and governance would do well to remember this. Your strong arm faction may not be what you think it is.

When the environment becomes rife for whistleblowers it is safe to assume the system is sick, returning the system to health is the way to prevent clarion calls from patriots... not threats and bullying.

Like the fire triangle, combustion is prevented when one required element is withdrawn.

What to withdraw is draconian approaches often seen in failed regimes.

Stay tuned...

6 comments :

  1. The really disturbing thing about this situation, is that a very large percentage of Americans (probably close to 80%) see nothing at all wrong with the government snooping on them and their neighbors. In fact, they are rather proud of it, because they love their government that keeps them "safe". Their refrain is always the same. "Well if you're not doing anything wrong, why would you care? You can bet they would vehemently deny it, but these same "free" people would have felt very secure and very much at home in the old Soviet Union under the Bolshevik regime.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Agreed Caroll, most cannot see beyond the obvious or the ramifications or intended consequence. I wonder how they would think if they found out that data collection is used to motivate community leaders to agree or disagree with certain things - as an example. The business of politics is dirty and underhand, fortunes are won and lost with the stroke of a pen... fertile ground for all manner of corruption, collusion and pressure.

    Unless of course your local and intermediate decision makers are living in bubble wrap or have no wayward family to protect... I guess that gives one scenario as to why this anti citizen behaviour is not only criminal but plain evil.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Some good points from LATimes
    Snowden's leak of NSA secrets reveals deeper problem.

    http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-0612-abcarian-nsa-20130612,0,1955626.story#tugs_story_display

    ReplyDelete
  4. USA! USA! USA! USA! SUPERBOWL! SUPERBOWL! SUPERBOWL!
    USA! USA! USA!

    ReplyDelete
  5. For the "I don't care, I have nothing to hide" peeps.

    What I see is the main issue with blanket privacy snooping, is it equally applies to those who are involved in governing at some level or another. It literally means everyone has a rap sheet of some sort--given we are not all perfect all the time one needs to wonder what undue influences can be brought to bear on folks responsible for decisions supposedly for our benefit. I see a wide open door to unfettered corruption in the world of law, politics, administration, corporate and all manner of places where sway is often sought in decision making. It may not be blackmail exactly, but a word here and a word there can certainly influence outcomes. The world of politics and high positions are dog eat dog to begin with--one can only imagine the steering possible with the one who has the goods on everyone. Paranoid-you betcha, I have ample reason to be given the avalanche of larceny, theft and brutality we see everyday from the world of TPTB.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Tatiana CovingtonJune 12, 2013 at 6:21 PM

    Let's all take leaks on the Feds.

    ReplyDelete

Please Leave Comment--Allow time for comment to appear.